Information about Milan

Information about Milan

Some information about Milan: According to the historian Livy, Milan was born in the sixth century BC by a Celtic village founded by Belloveso. Later, in 222 BC it was conquered by the Roman legions, who gave the name of “Mediolanum” (middle ground). In an attempt to rebel against the Roman supremacy, the city formed an alliance, a few years later, with Carthage, Rome’s enemy, but the Romans won and at the end of the first century AD, Milan became a part of the dominions of the great empire. Not many traces of Roman influence remained if not the Columns of San Lorenzo, the remains of a Roman Circus in Via Circo and the Monastero Maggiore, where one of the towers of Carceres (which gave the building a monumental function) was been integrated inside the monastery as a bell tower. These scarce remains, however, are sufficient to document that the public buildings were those of a large city.

With the subdivision of the Roman Empire in 292 AD, Milan became the capital of the western part of the Empire and became one of the largest settlements where they consolidated the new Christian religion. With the arrival of the Barbarians, it lost its role as the most important city in the region, due to the plundering of the 539 and the fact that, during the rule of the Lombards (from which it took its name from the Lombardia) that the city Pavia took on the role capital. Even the rule of the Franks, led by Charlemagne in 774, did not favor the recovery of the city, where it soon spread feudalism. With the disintegration of the Carolingian empire and the rise to power of the Marquis and the bishops, Milan was able to recover and grow economically.

In the eleventh century, after which in many cities of northern Italy developed a considerable autonomous movement (called communes) against attempts of control by the German emperors, the capital of Lombardia was distinguished for the fervor with which it argued that movement, governed with democratic laws and building the Palazzo della Ragione (center of political decisions). With the arrival of the Visconti family, ended the period of democratic government. From 1277 to 1447 the lordship of Milan kept focusing on the growing political / cultural city. It is thanks to them the for the construction of thel Duomo and the Castle.

After the family Visconti, Milan returned to the Republican government for 3 years, after which, in 1450, captain Francesco Sforza seized power.  This period was very important for the ever growing city, in fact, just in the second half of 1400s, many artists, including Bramante and da Vinci arrived in Milan, in addition, the Cathedral and the Castle were finished and the church of Santa Maria delle Grazie (home of The Last Supper) and the hospital that is now the State University were built. The beginnings of the 1500s, Northern Italy being a theater of battles between the French and Spanish monarchies, mark the beginning of Spanish rule, during which the Borromeo family built the Ambrosiana and the palace of the Jesuits (now the Brera Academy).

After nearly two centuries of the Spanish Government, control passed to the Austrian Habsburg dynasty which concentrated on the development of the economy, the functioning of the state apparatus, the arts, culture, education system and scientific development. The Brera Accademy and La Scala the Royal Palace, Villa Reale and many private palaces were built. After the Austrian influence, Milan, was influenced by French, becoming the first capital of the Cisalpine Republic and then the Kingdom of Italy (which included almost the whole of northern Italy).With the fall of Napoleon, the city came under the rule of the Austro-Hungarian Empire against which it rebelled becoming part of the Savoy (1859). Today Milan is the financial and economic hub of Italy.

Curiosities

Legends say, Milan owes its name to the discovery, by Bellovesus, of a “scrofa semilanuta” (half-woolly sow ), which became the symbol of the city from the domain Gallic until the sixth century. It is possible to admire a bas-relief of the animal on a capital of the Palazzo della Ragione.

The Milanese church has a liturgy different from the Roman thanks to the Ambrosian rite. The Advent begins on November 11th and lasts 6 weeks (according to the Roman rite it begins November 26 and lasts for 4 weeks), Lent does not begin on Ash Wednesday but the following Sunday. Thanks to the Ambrosian rite the Milanese carnival begins when the rest of Italy finishes and is celebrated on “Saturday before Lent.” The main characters are Meneghino (character of the comedies by Carlo Maria Maggi) and Cecca.

Special Events

Fair of the Oh Bej Oh Bej: the Patron Saint (St. Ambrose) is the most awaited festival in Milan (December 7). During this festival stalls are set up for the organization of the fair , divided into sections (Italy, Europe and non-European countries) and roasted chestnuts, wine, mustard and chestnut are served. The name of the fair is derived from the exclamation of children for the packages of sweets and toys donated by Pope Pius IV in 1510 (so pretty! so beautiful!). In addition, on December 7, from 2.00 pm to 6.00, seventy figures in sixteenth-century dress parade to commemorate St. Ambrogio and Milan, the capital of the Empire.

Useful Phone Number

City line: (+39) 020202
Tourist Information and Assistance: (+39) 0277404343; 0277404318 
Local Police: (+39) 020208 
Atm:  (+39) 800.80.81.81
Trenitalia – Milan North: (+39) 800.500.005
Guidami (car sharing service): (+39) 800.80.81.81
Milan Metro: (+39) 02 77471
Airport Information (SEA): (+39) 02 74852200

Last Supper Tickets  – Santa Maria delle Grazie Tickets – Milan Museums

For more information on how to book entrance tickets to the museums and churches of Milan please visit the  Milan Museum web site or call us (+39) 055-713655.
Available Entrance TicketsGuided Group ToursPrivate Guided Tours.

 

The most visited Milan Museums:
The Last Supper
Brera Gallery
Pinacoteca Ambrosiana

Related Posts

Information about Milan
Información de Milán
Information about Milan
Informazioni su Milano
Information about Milan
La Última Cena de Leonardo da Vinci
Information about Milan
The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci
Information about Milan
Entradas para la Pinacoteca de Brera
Information about Milan
Brera Gallery entrance ticket
Information about Milan
Entradas para la Última Cena de Leonardo
Information about Milan
The Last Supper entrance ticket
Information about Milan
Bramante Sacristy entrance ticket
Information about Milan
Visita privada a la Última Cena
Information about Milan
Last Supper Private Tour
Information about Milan
Pinacoteca Ambrosiana ticket
Information about Milan
La Pinacoteca de Brera
Information about Milan
The Brera Picture Gallery
Information about Milan
Pinacoteca Ambrosiana – Milán
Information about Milan
The Pinacoteca Ambrosiana
Information about Milan
La Sacristía de Bramante
Information about Milan
The Bramante Sacristy
Information about Milan
Entradas para la Sacristía de Bramante
Information about Milan
Il Tour Privato del Cenacolo
Information about Milan
Biglietto d’ingresso alla Sacrestia del Bramante
Information about Milan
Biglietto d’ingresso alla Pinacoteca Ambrosiana
Information about Milan
La Pinacoteca Ambrosiana
Information about Milan
La Sacrestia del Bramante
Information about Milan
Verano Sforzesco – eventos de verano en Milán
Information about Milan
Guido Crepax: Retrato de un artista
Information about Milan
Amor y Psique en Milán
Information about Milan
Cupid and Psyche in Milan
Information about Milan
Sforzesca summer – summer events in Milan
Information about Milan
La exposición de Modigliani en Palazzo Reale en Milán
Information about Milan
The Modigliani exhibition at Palazzo Reale in Milan

Leave Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *